Caregiving

Top 5 Inspirational Quotes on Caregiving, From Caregivers

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As part of our Caregivers Up Close series, we asked wives, husbands, parents and dear friends doing double-duty as family caregivers to talk about the struggles—and gifts—of caregiving.

Hoping that what they have been through might help other families, caregivers who have turned to CaringBridge over the years shared these inspirational quotes and words of wisdom:

Top 5 Quotes from Caregivers

  1. “You can stress about things out of your control, or you can turn them over to God. When you release things because there is nothing you can do, you turn them over to someone who has a bigger plan and a bigger control than you.”—Amy Amundson of New Prague, MN, who was plunged into caregiving after her son, Kevin, attempted suicide in response to undiagnosed depression.
  2. “Like airplane passengers, let’s not forget to put on our own oxygen masks first … we are no good to our loved ones if we collapse under the strain.”Peter Bailey of St. Paul, MN, who was the primary caregiver for his wife, Tanya, during treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, lymph and base of her tongue.
  3. “When you visit someone’s CaringBridge website, send Well Wishes. That’s huge. It cheers you on … you see that people are there with you, through the heartache.” —Molly Sturgis of Chaska, MN, a mom of two and the primary caregiver for her toddler son, Telly, through chemo, radiation and a bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia, said,
  4. “I had friends saying, ‘Oh, I really wanted to call to see how you were doing, but I didn’t want to bother you.’ I thought, ‘Call me. Tell me a funny story. My day was horrible, but if you make me laugh, it gives me a little break.'”Meritxell Mondejar Pont, a Minneapolis resident and Barcelona native, who lost her husband, Spiro, to glioblastoma multiforme, the worst kind of brain cancer, at age 35.
  5. “You have got to quit pretending it’s going to all change tomorrow morning, and learn how to be where you are, how you are, right now. I don’t deal with that as well as I ought to, but the best way I can think of to keep patience in the middle of everything is a sense of humor and some spiritual stuff. That’s what makes the biggest difference.”—Bud Hart of Alexandria, VA, a primary caregiver for his adult son, Mike, living for five years with an undiagnosed, and debilitating, autoimmune disease.

Add Your Own Quote

If you are a family caregiver, or the person on whom support is focused, add a helpful quote in the Comment section below. You might also be interested in reading 7 Things You Should Never Say to Caregivers or Patients.

Comments (9)

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Judy Lawrence Nov 30, 2017 3:39pm
I am not David’s caregiver but he is my very best friend. David and I have known each other since kindergarten. David moved away for many years. One day I was at the grape stomp in Murphys and who was there but David. Since then we have become very best friends. I would visit him at least two to three times a week. We had so much fun just talking and reminiscing. I went for in his sidecar and he even joined me for a pedicure. Please David don’t fight it just relax and be comfortable. I love you very much. Love. Your very best friend Judy Lawrence 😍
Nancy A. Moores, 22 year caretaker of my husband Nov 23, 2017 4:56pm
Take joy in the little things like a smile, a coherent moment, a minute to sit down and breathe. Take pride in knowing you're efforts are making a difference even if they can't tell you so.
Janet Hardigan Nov 22, 2017 10:17pm
Just hug
Bob Nov 22, 2017 9:37am
I’m the person on whom my wife’s caregiving is now focused. My oxygen-dependent Pulmonary Fibrosis came suddenly after a year of pneumonia, the appearance of mantle cell lymphoma, minor embolic stroke, chemo, and stem cell therapy. While it’s incurable and progressive, my support network has included the love and prayers of family and friends, using Caring Bridge (which is great!), and faith. I copied this from EWTN recently for Caregivers in all our lives, from my own faith and I know God listens to ALL our prayers. God Bless! : O Most Holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, we adore You! You have first loved us and through Your Son You have taught us the excellence of self-giving love. Give to those who are caregivers of a sick parent or child, brother or sister, the assistance of Your holy angels. Lessen their burdens and give them great joy in practicing a work of mercy. And since charity is never forgotten by You, reveal to them their heavenly reward. Amen.
Dana Schoonover Nov 21, 2017 10:52am
I don't have to like the situation I am in. I do have to like myself in the situation.
Stephanie Lamb Nov 20, 2017 8:14pm
Just breathe! Terminal cancer, stage 4, diagnosed 4/1/16. My husband is my caregiver, my best friend and Love! Married 36 years on 12/28/17! Just want him to be okay when I am no longer there to fix his collar!
THERESA DAVIS Nov 18, 2017 6:08am
God Bless You I have been a care giver for the better part of my life, but at the end of my shift I could go home. It is so very different when now I have been my husband's care giver. It makes one so tired, it never stops. He is now in the hospital and I am not sure what to do with myself. I wonder around the house knowing there is so much to do and I can't seem to even find the energy to know where to start. When I am in this state I do nothing. I have found that when I am at my weakest and have no choice, that seems to be when I am at my strongest. I don't know if that makes much since to you. I will pray for you and your family. God bless you sweetheart.
Scott Irwin Nov 15, 2017 9:22am
Having dealt with tragedy in our own lives and having helped others who have experienced similiar difficulties, one of the best things you can do is say how sorry you are they are going through something so painful, and then ask them how they are doing, and be a good listener.
Eloise VanderBilt, Cori's mother Nov 14, 2017 8:10pm
I am Cori Fordice's mother. Some of us, when we are not feeling well, go to bed and think about good things that have happened in the past. I have a story for Cori. I am 87 and have lived in three countries, so I have a wonderful storehouse of memories of friends I have met and languages I have learned. I remember when we first went to Japan with three children: Lori, Cori and Monty. Cori had blond wispy hair and none of our new friends in Japan had seen that kind of hair and wanted to touch it. Three-year-old Cori didn't understand that amount of attention at that time in her life and it annoyed her. We tried to explain to her that they loved her hair. It was like gold, and they had never seen golden hair before so they wanted to touch it. Eventually she learned to "grin and bear it".