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My Story

Welcome to Casey River Fisher's webpage. On November 26th 2012 we admitted Casey into CHLA (Children's Hospital in Los Angeles). On November 29th at approximately 3:00 pm Casey was diagnosed with (ALL) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Up to this point in Casey's life he was an innocent fun loving 8 year old. Now with the diagnoses of cancer his life will be changed forever. As Casey's parents we are going to keep his spirits high but no child should ever have to go thru something like this.

To those who don't know here is a little history of what is going on with our son Casey.Approximately one month ago Casey started to have a fever in the evenings. After multiple blood analysis and ruling out simple causes of his elevated white blood cell count, on Monday the 26th of November after an appointment with Casey's pediatrician, Dr. Jabaji decided it was time to take the steps to find out what was going on with his blood and contacted Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. Upon contacting the hospital the doctors advised us to admit him immediately. Casey was admitted to CHLA Monday night at 9:00 pm.On Wednesday the 28th Casey had a bone marrow biopsy and by Thursday the oncology team gave us the diagnosis that he has (ALL) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.
 
On Friday the 29th Casey had his first chemotherapy procedure which involved a Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to administer the first drugs as well as take a sample of the spinal fluid for analysis, also during the procedure they put a PICC line in his arm for drawing blood and administering chemotherapy drugs. After the procedure he then was taken for an MRI and after all he had been thru fell asleep in the MRI machine. Our son's case is a rare one for a few reasons. #1 is that he not only has a high white blood cell count also the eosinophile cells in the white blood cells are extremely high. The normal baseline for eosinophiles should be 3.5% of the white blood cells and Casey's count was 85%. #2 The high eosinophile count in his blood did some damage to the lining of both ventricles of his heart and created blood clots in both ventricles. #3 When they did a bone marrow biopsy they found staph infection in his bone marrow. With this development in his heart the treatment has been slowed because the clots have to be addressed first with a blood thinner and closely monitored because if they break loose the clots can cause and embolism. One bit of good news is that the analysis of the spinal fluid to see if the cancer was in his brain were negative, there were no cancer cells in his brain.Friday night after the MRI the doctors began to give casey the blood thinners to get his blood ready before giving any chemotherapy drugs, as they must work in coordination with each other.
 
Today is Saturday, the blood thinner is still being administered and by this evening the next round of chemotherapy drugs will be given as well.The Oncologist told us that by the 4th or 5th day of chemotherapy the cancer will melt away and signs of cancer will diminish. Even though this is exciting news the whole process including maintenance after 6 months will take 3 years.The doctors as well as this awesome hospital are amazing. The Oncologists, Hematologists, Cardiologists, Infectious disease, along with other specialists make a team who all collaborate together to come up with a plan of how best attack each case.

Long story short this has been a whirlwind week and we are definitely staying positive for a great outcome for Case. We want to thank everyone for the outpouring of thoughts and prayers and the continued support. Alan, Susan and especially Casey !